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March 12, 2009

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» Response to "SharePoint 2007: Gateway Drug to Enterprise Social Tools" from Michael Sampson: Currents
Last week Thomas Vander Wal trashed SharePoint as an enterprise social computing platform in a blog post entitled SharePoint 2007: Gateway Drug to Enterprise Social Tools. He ultimately concluded that SharePoint failed for enterprise 2.0. Apart from my... [Read More]

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Doug Cornelius

Mike -

I think "Time" is the thing to focus on with SharePoint. It has a long development and implementation timeline. (Tying into the other Office products just makes it longer.)

SharePoint 2007 is getting widespread deployment now, but its feature set was locked in back in 2004. It looks pretty good compared to what else was out there in 2004 for enterprise 2.0. SharePoint has aged and been outpaced by the changes since 2004.

The problem will probably be true in the next release of SharePoint. It is my understanding that they are locking the feature set right now. But by the time it is released and deployed in 2011(?) it will likely have been outpaced by the changes in the marketplace that have happened between now and then.

Microsoft will have trouble keeping pace with the nimble vendors. Microsoft has weighed itself down trying to tie tightly into desktop applications and legacy systems. But they have to.

Abigail Lewis-Bowen

This post is a great synopsis of the issues (Mike is clearly channeling many lives right now, including mine). But, what I find really interesting is the point about file-based workplace models, and how to break out of that conceptual framework. Ultimately, the file is the final representation of the work: the results, the product, the knowledge, the program. A fluid aggregation of communication and knowledge: tweets, chats, blogs, etc., with business data points requires a much more sophisticated level of interoperability - the promise of the Semantic Intranet. Until we achieve that, we are be doomed to sticking something in PowerPoint to convey it quickly to those who matter most.

Mike Gotta

Doug, my estimate: you are a year off +/- a few months on the lock-down for MOSS 2007. The feature set was not locked down in 2004.

Christy

Great post - It's not the technology, but how you implement and use it.

Have you heard of the TownSquare application Microsoft was supposedly testing? I'm hoping they build this out as an upgrade or plug-in to SharePoint (hopefully as an upgrade to an existing license!):
http://www.infoworld.com/article/08/06/11/Microsoft_testing_prototype_of_Facebooklike_social_network_1.html

Everything I find about it online dates back to middle of last year. I hope they haven't abandoned it.

Pim

Great post. Written by somebody who both understands Sharepoint and E2.0 and that's quite rare.

Mike Gotta

Hi Christy, TownSquare had a lot of attention in the media and then disappeared from the tech news. I also had heard from clients in Europe that Microsoft and/or its partners were making TownSquare available on a consulting basis. From what I know, TownSquare is an internal experiment in social awareness and following. Right now, it's not a product but could be folded into O14, or at least pieces of it. Some of Microsoft's partners (Accenture, Avanade) have the code so they can run with it on their own I suppose. You might also see portions show up on Codeplex I imagine. From what I've heard, it is built on top of Moss 2007 and the user experience is more of a social network site.

kirk

"Enterprise 2.0 is more about "how used", that it is about "what is"... "

How about "How easy it is to use .." ?

Sharepoint Sceptic

Most of this talk is from the standpoint of medium to large sized organizations. SharePoint, because of some of its shortcomings highlighted here - not out of the box, needs an IT intermediate to configure it to use most features, needs a specialist to customize it - makes it unsuitable for smaller organizations. Web based applications do a vastly better job of bringing collaboration and social features to smaller organizations. They are much closer to the ideal of content owners having full control of how content is published and distributed.

Tim

Mike, I agree with what you said, it takes so long between releases. Sharepoint has its place but its not for everyone.

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